Monday, September 28, 2015

(Don't) Clean up Your Mess

Hey, what's wrong with messes? We look great, right?
The more I live with people instead of just coexisting in proximity, the more I recognize something—there are a of of messed up people out there. Even more messed up than I am. Yes, true story.

The other thing I've come to recognize is that being messed up is not necessarily a bad thing. Neat lives are often a sign of lives so carefully curated that they are museum dioramas, not lives. And the thing about museum dioramas? They're full of dead things. Stuffed dead things. This is not appealing to most of us as an environment.

A little bit of mess signals a life that's lived in, like a couch with graham cracker crumbs welded to the underside of the cushions. That life has taken risks, known joy, and has the stains to prove it. Some messes are dangerous, toxic spills that needs to be cleaned up out of our lives. But others? We need them to prove we're alive.

I never wanted or imagined the mess of a loved one with mental illness and attendant self-destructive behavior. Given the choice, I'd have picked the carefully curated life. Having chosen that, I would have missed out on a lot that has made me alive.

I had no idea I was living amid dead things.

Sometimes messes just mean something better is coming.
Because of that experience, I've been able to share a lot with people whose lives are broken in various ways, and similar variations on a theme keep returning. It's hard. It hurts. But we have learned so much. When you're in the slime and mud of the mess, though, you really want to know what exactly people have learned. What could possibly make this worthwhile? What could anyone tell me to make me appreciate this wrenching time of uncertainty?

I'm not sure. I suspect that when people are slogging through those times is not always the best opportunity to offer sage advice. Most of us aren't ready to hear it when the pain is shrieking louder than the wisdom. But people ask. What do you find out about life, and yourself, when your world is a mess? How do you even survive?

The answer to the second question is easy: God's grace and insistent love. Nothing more or less.

The answer to the first could go on a while. But here are a few thoughts.

I learned that grace was a choice I didn't make often enough. 

I had theoretically believed in grace, but operationally, I extended it mostly to those who didn't look like they needed it. For those with rough edges and incomprehensible, annoying behavior? Maybe when they got themselves together. My reality of grace was not even close to God's dream of it for me. I had no idea that grace looked a lot more like hugging a drug addict than praying for lunch at Panera.

Grace got out of hand the moment the God of the universe hung on a Roman cross and with outstretched hands looked out upon those who had hung him there and declared, 'Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.' Grace has been out of hand for more than two thousand years now. We best get used to it.” (Rachel Held Evans, Searching for Sunday)


I never understood that before. I didn't really want to. Now, I don't want anything else.

I learned that love is always a good thing to decide. 

You might get hurt. You will be taken advantage of. But love reserved for those who deserve it and won't tamper with it is not love at all. It's a calculated investment. CS Lewis said, To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken.”

I didn't understand that until I had to choose to love not only my loved one in a mess but the people it brought into our lives. It seemed God put them there despite what I wanted, so the only real choice was to love them. And they did, indeed, break my heart. But broken hearts are the best kind for letting others inside.   [tweet this]. God's dream for me was to lavish unconditional love, as He did. My reality had been fearful half loving.

I learned to honestly believe that He loves us. 

He loves our messes. Really.
He can handle them.

Driving with a loved one to a potential prison sentence is about as messy as it gets. Until in the middle of praying you hear those words on the radio, “If His grace is an ocean we're all sinking; oh, how He loves us so.” And you realize for perhaps the first, or at least the most profound, time that they are true. Not just for you but for the person sitting next to you. And all those other persons out there who have messes in their lives and need that grace like an ocean. He loves. Beyond our imagination.

He takes care of the messes, beyond our imagination. All the worries and terrors and anxieties about them do nothing helpful, while putting the mess in His hands and leaving it there always does. Because He Loves are the most needed and true words you will ever hear, and they are bedrock when life feels more like a mudslide than a picnic.

I don't know if you're feeling messy right now, and I don't know if it helps to be told those things. Maybe you have to learn them yourself in the fire. I think, though, that at least it helps to know someone else has been in that mess, and it has not won.

Something better is still coming.
We still have not finished this mess.
Have you seen the sign some people hang in their kitchen that reads “God Bless This Mess”? Yeah. That's about right. Ask Him to. He will.






2 comments:

kellyjohnsongracenotes.com said...

Such good stuff here, Jill! Love it! Spending time at a homeless shelter every week has changed me and deepened my understanding of grace. Having an alcoholic father and a mentally ill daughter did the same. Being willing to share my own messiness is some of the brave work I am still doing. Thank you for these words of encouragement!

Brooke said...

I'm pretty sure those who are living a clean life are either lying to their friends or to themselves. not sure its possible to walk this messy Earth without picking up a bit.
I ordered "Searching for Sunday" last week - thanks for sharing that quote. I'm super excited to get started reading it.